Lady and the Champs – Saturday Morning

Editor’s note: this post is a compliation of my notes for the morning. I’ll edit it in the next couple of days for better clarity.

Okay. When someone asks you to volunteer at a speakers conference, be careful what you ask for. You might find yourself dancing (!) in front of 200 people. No more comment on that…

For the opening, we were able to hear about each of the breakouts for the day. Our MC, Gregory Lay was in a Tux and the theme was Hooray for Hollywood. He introduced the speakers with a red carpet feel and E! channel savvy. All of the sessions look good, it’s a bummer that I have to chose some over others.

My plan is to go to Craig Valentine’s breakouts on Storytelling and Speech Coaching and then Patricia Fripp’s session on How to Market Your Business by Speaking at Service Clubs.

In the opening keynote, Patricia Fripp told us about the similarities between our presentations and movie productions in Hooray for Hollywood! Movie Techniques that Impact your Presentation.

This was an amazing presentation on the similarities between something we all are familiar with (movies) and what we all want to do better (speak).

Are you developing characters or moving the story forward? – Darren LaCroix

Have an emergency close – Ed Tate

Patricia told us about how Hollywood films multiple endings to a movie, then tests them with test audiences

Just like in the movies, your speech must have a premise (i.e. Craig’s Foundational Phrase). i.e. when she says “Bomb on a bus” what movie do you think of. Even though it’s not a new movie everyone knew the answer.

She touched on collaboration, and talked about how we need to work with others to create our best work.

It’s very difficult to be creative in isolation. – Patricia Fripp

The principles in one discipline are the same in any other discipline.

Use the Movie Story Formula in your speeches
a day in the life
SOMETHING HAPPENS (Thanks to Fripp for sending this to me! – see coments below)
and the result of that is…
and the result of that is…

A movie is like life with all of the dull parts left out – Alfred Hitchcock

Be descriptive – Being a scientist is like working on a jigsaw puzzle outside at night, in a snowstorm, without all of the pieces and with no picture to look at.

If you had just one sentence instead of 45 minutes, what would you say? … That can be your opening sentence.

An audience would rather hear a simple story well told, than a brilliant story badly told – Robert McKee

Review
collaboration
universal principles
need a good story – well told
good structure
good characters
back story
sparkling dialog
rooting principles

Average screenplay is 127 pages, and the first 3 have to kick ass
– inciting incident (central theme – premise)
– scene changes
– gets the gilt/dies a hero

British word of the day: Nip
In a sentence – “if you don’t like that movie, you’ll take your popcorn and nip next door to another movie”

when you tell a story, you may not tell it in order, but you should develop it in order

Greg LeMond
Had to speak to a corporate audience, after winning 3 Tour de France races

the story might be different, but the connection is the same

Give the best lines to the other characters. When Greg called his wife during the ’89 race to say he might quit, she replied “you do what you feel is right, you know what is best…But, I didn’t marry a quitter”. that may not be an exact quote. I’ll see if I can find it and update it later

People will stand in the rain to watch a blockbuster. Will they stand in the rain to hear your speech?

What makes a movie a hit? What are Your Five Memorable Moments? (you fill in)
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

Check out more from Fripp on www.fripp.com

Next… off to Craig Valentine’s Storytelling session

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